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2.9 Route 53: DNS Servers

Amazon provides a full-fledged DNS service with Route 53, and this service integrates very well with others in AWS, as well as allowing domain registration. In this lesson we will look more closely at the integration between Route 53 and other AWS services and see how to achieve geolocation-based routing.

2.9 Route 53: DNS Servers

Hi, welcome back to Explore Amazon Web Services. In this lesson, we are going to look at Route 53, a convenient way of hooking your AWS servers to your domains. Of course it isn't limited to AWS. Route 53 is a full fledged DNS service. You can use to manage your domains but it integrates especially well within the AWS echosystem. First I'm going to register a domain through Amazon. You don't have to do this, but you certainly can and the prices are quite cheap. I'm playing the rather unknown sport of kin-ball and let's say I want to make a website to help others with training. So let's register one of those fancy new generic domains. Kin-ball [INAUDIBLE] training. You have to fill in a lot of contact data, and can choose to register either as a person or as an organization or public body. Since all of the data I'm entering here is public record anyways, I'm not going to worry about privacy. I can also choose to hide some of the data like my phone number or address. But the availability of this feature depends on the domain. For the training, I know it is [INAUDIBLE], which next screen also tells us. Now we only have to accept the terms and off we go. Our new domain will be registered. We can view the status in Pending Requests. When registration is finished, the list becomes empty and our domain moves to Registered Domains, where we can view and edit details of it. To manage DNS it automatically creates a host zone for us. Everything that is living under kin-ball.training is part of this zone. Right now only the name service itself and [INAUDIBLE] authority record is present, but we can easily add a new record set. One of the most convenient features of Route 53 is creating an alias This directly connects to the main record screen packet, Elastic Load Balancer or CloudFront distribution. I already created a packet for that domain, so let's use that as the root. Now let's create another record and have a look at routing policies. Off camera, I've created a few load balancers in different regions. We are going to use geolocation routing to send users to the nearest datacenter. Let's start with the US. In using geolocation, you can either choose single countries or, as in our case, whole continents. We are calling the subdomain coaching.kin-ball.training. I'll also evaluate the health of the target, but don't associate this with the health check. Health checks are a great way to verify your sources are working as planned. When you associate a record with such as [INAUDIBLE], Route 53 will emit it when the check fails. I'll also enter a set id to enter identify our record in the geolocation group. Now I'm going to do the same for Europe and Asia and also add a default record to point to the Europe location. Let's have a look at health checks. Those verify that the resource is responding. You can either state an IP address or a domain. In our case, we want to check the root page of our domain. Note that this will also succeed if your server sends an error response. It only tries to establish a TC connection, nothing more When we associate the health check with let's say, the coaching record for Asia, it won't provide those users with the record for the local datacenter, but with the default one when the main site is down. Looking at the health check again, after this doesn't work, you can see the status graph as well as the individual responses to the checks. Right now, it's 403 forbidden, since the bucket is empty. Let's visit our coaching subdomain. As you can see, it sends me to the European region, which has two instances running. I'm either routed to Europe one or two. This isn't the responsiblity of Route 53 anymore, but of the load balancer When I am trying to change a record to point to the same location, Route 53 shows an arrow. When using geolocation routing, you can only have one record set pointing to a region with the same name. Of course, Route 53 DNS is limited to the aliases. It also has all the other record types you're used to, like MX or TXT records. Finally, a quick mention of another routing policy, Weighted routing. This allows you to direct a certain portion of your traffic in one direction. You can for instance state as you want to return one record twice as often as the other one by giving it a weight of two. This is DNS on AWS using Route 53. In the next lesson, we're going to take a quick look at various other services that are worth mentioning, but haven't been presented in this course. See you there.

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