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Ruby

The Intro to Rails Screencast I Wish I Had

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Isn't it funny how most "introduction to Ruby on Rails" screencasts are overly simplistic, and rely on generators like scaffolding? The teacher typically follows up the tutorial by stating that most Rails developer don't use scaffolding generators. Well that's not much help then! I'd like to give you the tutorial I wish I had. Along the way, we'll also rely heavily on test-driven development to build a simple app.

Choose HD for the clearest picture.

Covered in this Screencast...

  • Create models and generators
  • Use test-driven development to plan and test an application’s features
  • Work with ActiveRecord
  • Autotest with Guard
  • Use Rspec and Capybara to simulate the user.
  • Create partials
  • Take advantage of Flash notices
  • …and plenty more

Conclusion

If you watched the entire screencast, I hope you enjoyed it! There's certainly much more to cover, but we crammed a great deal into thirty minutes or so! What other tricks and techniques have you picked up, if you're just digging into Rails?

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