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ASP.NET

ASP.NET from Scratch: Lesson 3

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Picking up where Lesson two left off, this new installment of ASP.NET From Scratch covers more C# programming fundamentals – namely class inheritance and interfaces. In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use inheritance to save time and code. You’ll also learn about the concept of interfaces, and how they can make your applications and components flexible and maintainable. You'll also be introduced to the Object Browser, a feature of Visual Studio that organizes all classes within the Framework Class Library and your project in a browsable format.


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